Chrysler Crossfire

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Chrysler Crossfire
Chrysler Crossfire
Automotive industryChrysler (2004-07)
Chrysler LLC (2007-08)
Production2004-2008
AssemblyOsnabrück, Germany
Car classificationSports car
Car body style2-door Convertible
2-door Coupe
Automobile layoutFR layout
Automobile platformChrysler ZH
Mercedes-Benz R170
Internal combustion engine3.2Liter (195 cu in), 215 Horsepower (160 Kilowatt) V6[1]
3.2L (195 cu in) SC 330 hp (246 kW) V6 [2]
Transmission (mechanics)5-speed Automatic transmission
6-speed Manual transmission
Wheelbase94.5 in (2400 mm)
Length159.8 in (4059 mm)
Width69.5 in (1765 mm)
Height51.5 in (1308 mm) (coupe)
51.8 in (1316 mm) (roadster)
Fuel capacity15.9 US gal (60 L; 13 imp gal)
RelatedMercedes-Benz SLK-Class
Automotive designEric Stoddard
Side view with the "Crossfire" character line.
2005 Crossfire SRT-6 Coupe in Aero Blue.
2006 Crossfire Convertible.
Crossfire convertible interior.
Crossfire engine.

The Chrysler Crossfire is a Rear-wheel drive, Sports car marketed by Chrysler as both coupé and Convertible and built for Chrysler by Karmann of Germany.

Contents

Design


The two-seater arrived in 2001 as a Concept car designed by Eric Stoddard[3] with further refinement by Andrew Dyson[4] before production in 2003.

The Crossfire's fastback roof and broad rear fenders made for a rear end design that prompted automotive journalists to describe the new car's resemblance to American Motor's 1965-1967 Marlin. For example, Rob Rothwell wrote ...when I first espied the rear lines of the Chrysler Crossfire I was instantly transported back to 1965 and my favorite car of that year, the Rambler Marlin.[5]

The name Crossfire refers to the two character lines that run from front to rear along the body sides — crossing each other midway through the door panel. Conceived during the period of Chrysler's ownership by Daimler-Benz, the name also refers to the collaboration of the two companies.

Construction and features


The Crossfire shares 59%[citation needed] of its components with other Mercedes models. The chassis is a combination of a modified Mercedes-Benz C-Class engine compartment, pre-2003 Mercedes-Benz SLK-Class Automobile platform, S-Class rear linkages and new stampings for the side rails and rear.

The standard Transmission (mechanics) is a 6-speed Manual transmission with an optional 5-speed Automatic transmission. Base (Standard) and Limited models, originally sold beginning in the 2004 model year, are equipped with a 3.2 L, 18-Valve, SOHC V6 engine which produces 215 hp (160 kW) and 229 lb·ft (310 N·m) of Torque.

Sales


The sales of the Crossfire have been slow, with an average 230 day supply of the vehicles as of November 2005. In December, the cars were listed on Overstock.com to clear out inventory. Very few Crossfires were imported to the United States and Mexico for 2006 (and almost all of these were roadsters). [6]

On November 1, 2007, Chrysler announced that, as part of its restructuring plans, the Chrysler Crossfire would be one of four models discontinued after the 2008 model year.[7]

The last Crossfire rolled off of the assembly line on December 17, 2007.

Year[8][9] 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Production 35,700 28,000 12,500 4,805 2,000
Note: Cars produced in one calendar year may be marketed as the following model year.

Models

Model Years Engine Diplacement Power Torque 0-60 mph (97 km/h)
Limited 2004-2008 3.2 V6 195.2 Cubic inch (3199 cc) [1] 215 hp (160 kW)[1] 229 lb·ft (310 N·m)[1] 6.5 sec (6-speed manual)[10]
Base (Standard) 2005-2008
SRT-6 2005-2006 3.2 Liter Supercharged V6 330 hp (246 kW)[2] 330 lb·ft (447 N·m) 4.8 sec (five-speed automatic)[11]

For the first model year (2004), only the coupe was offered (with no "trim" levels), equipped quite similarly to the next year's "limited" model. In model year 2005, there were six variants available; Coupe and Roadster, each with three trim levels: Base (with fewer amenities), Limited, and SRT-6 (supercharged).

SRT-6

The SRT-6 trim level, as both Coupe and Convertible, featured the Supercharger engine delivering 349 hp (260 kW) and 340 lb·ft (461 N·m) of torque.[2] Differentiating features included Suspension (vehicle) and Brake modifications, front spoiler, Autostick transmission, fixed vs. retractable rear Spoiler (automotive) and available Automotive navigation system.

In 2006, the SRT-6 was changed to special order only and the Base trim level was renamed to Standard.

References

Inline
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 http://www.media.chrysler.com/dcxms/assets/specs/08_ChryslerCrossfireTech.pdf
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 http://www.media.chrysler.com/dcxms/assets/specs/2006crossfireSRT6specs.pdf
  3. Phil Patton (2007-05-27). "From a Bad Marriage, Pretty Babies". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/27/automobiles/27DESIGN.html?ex=1182052800&en=96cb47326aa3af0a&ei=5070. Retrieved on 15 June 2007. 
  4. "Chrysler Crossfire - Road Test & Review". Automobile Magazine. http://www.automobilemag.com/reviews/coupes/0304_chrysler_crossfire/index.html. 
  5. Rothwell, Rob. "2004 Chrysler Crossfire Coupe Road Test" American Auto Press, May 2, 2004, retrieved on January 30, 2009.
  6. "Overstock.com Announces New Marketing Partnership With Chrysler Group". Press Release (Overstock.com). http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-11826007_ITM. Retrieved on 26 November 2008. 
  7. Dee-Ann Durbin (AP) (2007). "Chrysler to cut up to 12,000 jobs". Yahoo News. http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071101/ap_on_bi_ge/chrysler_job_cuts. Retrieved on 2007. 
  8. "Chrysler caught in own Crossfire?". Autoblog.com. http://www.autoblog.com/2006/03/14/chrysler-caught-in-a-crossfire/#comments. Retrieved on 2006. 
  9. Figures for 2006/2007: Automobil Revue, catalogue edition 2008, p. 47.
  10. Swan, Tony. "2004 Chrysler Crossfire - Road Tests", Car & Driver, July 2003, retrieved on January 25 2008.
  11. Robinson, Aaron, "2005 Chrysler Crossfire SRT-6 - Comparison Tests", Car & Driver, March 2005, retrieved on January 25 2008.
General
  • "2004 Crossfire SRT-6 Packs Punch". Motor Trend (May, 2004): 30. 


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