Chrysler 3.3 engine

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Chrysler 3.3 engine
3.3 L Chrysler V6 in a 2005 Chrysler Town and Country
Automotive industryChrysler Corporation
Production1990–

This engine was Chrysler's first homegrown Front wheel drive 60-degree V6 engine, and the first V6 from Chrysler not based on a V8. It was designed to replace the Mitsubishi-sourced 3.0 L V6 in the minivans and debuted in 1990.

There are two major variants of this basic design. The smaller 3.3 L and 3.8 L are Pushrod engine, while the 3.5 L, 3.2 L, 2.7 L, and 4.0 L are Overhead cam. The 3.2 L was dropped after 2001, but Chrysler continues to produce the 3.3 L, 3.8 L, and 3.5 L versions of this engine along with the 2.7 L LH V6. This line is expanded further for 2006 with the addition of the 4.0 L engine debuting in the Dodge Nitro.

Family Displacement Bore Stroke Years Power Torque
OHV3.3 L (3301 cc/201.5 CID)93 mm (3.66 in)81 mm (3.19 in)1990–1993150 hp (112 kW)180 ft·lbf (244 N·m)
1994–1995162 hp (121 kW)194 ft·lbf (263 N·m)
1996–2000158 hp (118 kW)203 ft·lbf (275 N·m)
2001–180 hp (134 kW)210 ft·lbf (285 N·m)
3.8 L (3778 cc/230.6 CID)96 mm (3.78 in)87 mm (3.43 in)1991–1993150 hp (112 kW)213 ft·lbf (289 N·m)
1994–1995162 hp (121 kW)213 ft·lbf (289 N·m)
1996–1997166 hp (124 kW)227 ft·lbf (308 N·m)
1998–2000180 hp (134 kW)240 ft·lbf (325 N·m)
2001–2007215 hp (160 kW)245 ft·lbf (332 N·m)
2008– 197 hp (147 kW)230 ft·lbf (312 N·m)[1]
OHC3.5 L (3518 cc/214.7 CID)96 mm (3.78 in)81 mm (3.19 in)1994–1997214 hp (160 kW)221 ft·lbf (300 N·m)
2002-2004 (Standard Output)234 hp (174 kW)241 ft·lbf (327 N·m)
1999– (High Output)255 hp (190 kW)250 ft·lbf (339 N·m)
3.2 L (3231 cc/197.2 CID)92 mm (3.62 in)81 mm (3.19 in)1998–2001225 hp (168 kW)225 ft·lbf (305 N·m)
4.0 L (3952 cc/241.2 CID)96 mm (3.78 in) 91 mm (3.58 in)2007–255 hp (190 kW)262 ft·lbf (355 N·m)[2]
DOHC (LH)2.7 L (2736 cc/167 CID)86 mm (3.39 in)78.5 mm (3.09 in)1998–200 hp (149 kW)190 ft·lbf (258 N·m)

OHV


The original 3.3 engine, as well as the larger 3.8 L variant, are traditional Pushrod engine. The 3.3 was introduced in 1990 and was joined in 1994 by the 3.8. Both remain in production today in Trenton, Michigan, and both use a cast iron block and aluminum heads.

3.3

The first of the family was a standard Pushrod engine version with a cast iron block and aluminum heads. It is 3.3 L (3301 cc/201 CID) with a 93 mm (3.66 in) bore and 81 mm (3.19 in) stroke. The 3.3 got an increase in power of 12 hp (9 kW), for a total of 162 hp (121 kW), in 1994 thanks to a new intake. In 2001, the engine got a Variable Intake System which boosted output to 180 hp (134 kW) at 5000 rpm with 210 ft·lbf (285 N·m) of torque at 4000 rpm. The engine was designed for Transverse engine mounting but was modified for Longitudinal engine use in the LH cars.

Code-name EGA, it is built at Trenton Engine in Trenton, MI. It uses SFI Fuel injection, has roller tappets and features forged steel connecting rods, a one-piece cast camshaft, and either a cast aluminum or reinforced plastic intake manifold.

Vehicles using the 3.3 include:

3.8

The 3.3 was bored and stroked (3.78 in/96 mm and 3.43 in/87 mm respectively) to create a 3.8 L (230.5 CID/3778 cc) variant.[1] This EGH version is built at Trenton Engine in Trenton, MI.

The 3.8 got an increase in power of 12 hp (9 kW), for a total of 162 hp (121 kW) in 1994 via a new intake system. In 1998 the compression ratio increased for a total of 180 hp (134 kW) and 240 ft·lbf (325 N·m). In 2001, the engine got a Variable Intake System which boosted output to 215 hp (160 kW) at 5000 rpm with 245 ft·lbf (332 N·m) of torque at 4000 rpm.

Vehicles using the 3.8 include:

SOHC


A single Overhead cam was an addition to the lineup for 1993. Introduced with the 3.5 L engine, this design spawned the DOHC 2.7 L Chrysler LH engine, as well as the 3.2 L and 4.0 L variants. All but the 2.7 and high-output 3.5 (which features an aluminum block) are produced in Trenton, Michigan.

DOHC


Main article: Chrysler LH engine

The DOHC 2.7 L Chrysler LH engine was based on this same design, though the bore, stroke, and production site are different.

References

See also

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